Tag Archives: art

Global Classrooms of Chicago Visits Lightology for Hands-On Education

Global Classrooms of Chicago - Students on the Lightology Roof Deck

On Wednesday, a lively and engaged crew of high school students from Global Classrooms of Chicago stopped by our showroom for a hands-on learning experience. Students from Kenny Bae’s Urban Planning class visited Lightology to learn about lighting and electricity.

It was a different crowd than our usual student tours, typically given to college-aged students of design. We welcomed the younger group with open arms and were thrilled to find them so captivated by the tour, led by Lightology sales consultant and lighting expert, Jeremy Baker.

Global Classrooms Students Learn About Pure Lighting at Lightology

Favoring hands-on experience over textbook learning, Global Classrooms of Chicago engages students from various Chicago public schools in a supplementary, industry-driven education.

They are working on a project to re-light a room with more energy-efficient, less expensive fixtures. They stopped by today to get a feel for creative, more efficient & economic ways of doing so. At the end of their project they will submit a business proposal, and the best plan will be used to re-light one room of their school.

About Global Classrooms

Established in 2001, Global Classrooms has grown into an international program working in 24 cities around the world. Sponsored by the United Nations Association of the USA (USA-UN), the program’s purpose is teaching students in underserved communities to be global citizens by bridging “the gap in the Model UN community between experienced programs and traditionally underserved public schools.” (USNA.org)

At the core of the Global Classrooms’ curriculum is the Model UN Conference, where students roleplay as international delegates and debate a variety of issues that challenge today’s global community.

Chicago’s Model UN Summit is TODAY!   (April 26, 2013)

GC Chicago – Lightology Student Tour – Photo Gallery

Jeremy Baker Explains the Art and Science Behind Pure Recessed LightingLightology Sales Consultant Jeremy Baker Talks Lighting Design

Global Classrooms Students Absorbed in the Morpheus Room DemonstrationGlobal Classrooms Students Absorbed in the Morpheus Room Lighting DemonstrationGlobal Classrooms Students Take Photos in the Morpheus Room

Global Classrooms Students Learn About Softline RGB LED at Lightology

Global Classrooms Students Learn About Softline RGB LED at Lightology
Swarovski Chandelier at LightologyGlobal Classrooms students admire some chandeliers at LightologyGlobal Classrooms Students Climb the 'Evolution of Light' Stairwell - Reach the Disco EraGlobal Classrooms Students Relax in Lightology's Rooftop Cocoon
Global Classrooms Students Dig Our Giant Rooftop Horse LampGlobal Classrooms Students Enjoying Lightology's Roofdeck
Global Classrooms Students Enjoying Lightology's Rooftop LoungeGlobal Classrooms Students Enjoying Lightology's Rooftop LoungeGlobal Classrooms Students Learn About Chandeliers at Lightology

To learn more about Global Classrooms and Global Classrooms of Chicago, visit their website.

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Meet Product Designers Caleb Siemon and Carmen Salazar

Caleb Siemon and Carmen Salazar’s lighting product line, exclusively available at Lightology, initially caught our attention with their Banded Orb pendants, vibrantly colored glass inspired by the topography of California.

Banded Orb Pendants

Banded Orb Pendants

Their entire line of hand blown glass pendants, wall sconces and table lamps shows off Caleb Siemon’s signature aesthetic of thick glass and exciting colors.

Read on to find out how Caleb & Carmen became one of Southern California’s most exciting new product designers.

Caleb Siemon

Caleb Siemon

Caleb Siemon

Most glassblowers aren’t born artists,” says Caleb Siemon. “They’re born pyromaniacs.” Son of a jeweler, he grew up making things with his hands, got hooked on glass in high school, and honed his craft at the Rhode Island School of Design. He then set out for Murano, Italy, with a backpack, a few words of Italian, and the hope of an apprenticeship with renowned master glass sculptor Pino Signoretto. The maestro ignored him for a month, while Caleb attentively sketched his work and tried not to get in the way. Eventually an apprenticeship evolved.

Caleb spent two years in the Muranese studio with the glassmaker versatile enough to produce both enormous sculptures and delicate goblets. Here, he was encouraged to “steal with his eyes.” Caleb’s style shows the influence of his early tutor, coupled with an unabashed passion for the medium. “The transparency and fluidity of the material makes it unique,” he says. “I always start with an idea, but have learned to remain flexible to allow for the natural qualities of the glass”.

Caleb returned to Southern California in 1999 and constructed his own Italian-style studio. From furnace heights and bench design, to a system where each piece is created closely with a team of assistants, his methods reflect his Muranese immersion. Loris Zanon, Pino Signoretto’s master coldworker, traveled from Murano to guide the construction of Caleb’s coldshop and pass on the techniques of glass carving and polishing.

From the Scandinavian glass tradition, Caleb has developed an affection for simple forms, taking advantage of gravity and centrifugal force in design. By pairing these approaches to glassmaking, he has developed a signature aesthetic that reflects the evolved detail of the Muranese and balance and restraint of the Scandinavians. Caleb continues to invite international glass workers to his studio to share their techniques with the next generation of glass artists. His work exhibits internationally and is featured in galleries around the world.

Lattimo Pendants

Lattimo Pendants

Carmen Salazar

Carmen Salazar

Carmen Salazar

While her husband has binged on glass with a singular focus, his wife and partner, Carmen Salazar, has sipped from many ponds. Sculptor, metalworker, architect, botanist, scavenger, and conservationist, Carmen is a curious hybrid of urban and rural. She brings the influence of many streams to her work in the glass shop. She is a recipe that calls for equal parts concrete and pasture, glass and steel and rough-hewn beams. Carmen grew up shuttling between Washington DC and the family farm in Augusta, West Virginia. In college, she began to cultivate a love for metal, glass, and the vegetal world. Carmen left the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in sculpture and art history, but also a peripatetic interest in reshaping the larger natural world.

In 1997, she drove to San Francisco where she spent two years working for a land artist, metal sculptors, horticulturalists, and glass blowers. In 1999, she moved to Orange County to help Caleb build his first shop. “I thought I was just going down for a month or so” she says, “but here we are, a decade later.” The intersection of her diverse interests led her to the Southern California Institute of Architecture in 2001.

After receiving her masters in architecture at SCI-Arc in Los Angeles, Carmen worked in the high end residential realm and then on the design team for a large scale public park. With her skills in architecture, interior and landscape design, the pair have embarked on an aesthetic leap forward.

They are now executing large scale custom projects and installations while maintaining the studio’s carefully cultivated quality and visual signature. “I have a somewhat less controlled aesthetic than Caleb. Maybe it comes from working with so many plants.” says Carmen, “I love to scavenge pieces from the studio, tests and such, and re-purpose them. Caleb always looks like he has a tinge of fear when I start experimenting in the studio, like, ‘gosh, I hope she doesn’t blow us up today.’”

Happy Kiss Pendants

Happy Kiss Pendants

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Go Green: Make It Your New Year’s Resolution

The New Year is upon us – and it’s time to make some changes! Many of you are asking how to can save money and be energy-efficient, so make it your resolution! Here are some great tips on how to conserve energy, increase lamp life and save money on lighting in 2011.

Replace Inefficient Above, Under and In-Cabinet Lights with LED Soft Strip and LED Puck Lights


The average home will use cabinet lights around 2,000 hours per year; retail stores around 4,000 hours. When you install LED Soft Strip and Puck Lights, residential homes will enjoy 20 years of illumination!

The flexible and linear LED Soft Strip uses between 1 and 3 watts per foot and has all kinds of connectors to create custom shapes and sizes. LED Puck lights are compact, 3 watt fixtures that look great inside cabinets or closets and can either be surface mounted or recessed.

Use the Cody LED Picture Light to Illuminate Artwork Without Damaging UV or IR Rays

No one wants their valuable artwork and priceless family photographs damaged, discolored or faded from the harmful UV and IR rays that incandescent and halogen light sources put out. Using LEDs eliminates these concerns while also saving energy – the Cody LED Picture Light uses 6-12 watts (depending on size) emits zero harmful UV or IR rays and contains no mercury.

Convert Incandescent Bulbs to CFL or LED

LEDs are improving everyday, and you can always find the latest technology at Lightology. Our LED replacement bulbs are used to replace standard incandescent and halogen light sources while saving large amounts of energy and lasting up to 45,000 hours. For example, the EnduraLED A-19 is a direct replacement for a standard incandescent and uses only 7 watts!

Use Dimmers and Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy and Increase Lamp Life

By dimming incandescent or halogen lights just 10%, you not only save 10% on energy costs, but it also increases the lamp life by 80%! For example:

Incandescent Bulb Lifespan
Full Brightness: 1,000 hours
Dimmed 10%: 1,800 hours

This increase in lamp life helps save money, lower energy use and reduces waste. Add an Occupancy Sensor that uses motion detectors to turn lights on/off, making energy-saving a no-brainer!

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Design With Light Winners!

 

Finalists from Left to Right: Derek Porter, Jasmin Marie, John Clark, Kristin Taghon, Elliot Eakin, Dru Wallon, Joseph Nicotera, Sam Matson, Curtis Cassell

 

 

After many months, Lightology’s first-ever design competition has come to an end! Last night, over 200 people came to celebrate with most of our finalists and congratulate them for their amazing designs! To see more photos from the event, visit our facebook page.

Congratulations to our winners!

Grand Prize

Derek Porter Studio

“Taut”

People’s Choice

Sepp Spenlinhauer and Brian Fassett/Eclectic Precision

“Sparkle Globe”

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Two Weeks Left to Enter the Design With Light Contest!

Don’t forget to submit your design idea for a chance to win a $2,000 Lightology gift card and a feature in i4design Magazine!

Entry Form

Official Rules

Stay Updated on our Facebook page!

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Don’t Leave a Lonely Chandelier

Staff Tips: Xavier Yager

“When it comes to lighting, every room must be dealt with individually,” says Certified Lighting Consultant Xavier Yager, of Lightology.

Yager has been in lighting design for 15+ years and knows that you must take into account the room’s purpose, the decor and the architecture before deciding how to best light the space.

“If we’re talking about the dining room, it is important to remember that it is more than just a place to sit and eat,” says Yager. “It is a place to entertain. Furthermore, the atmosphere or mood we wish to achieve may change depending on the time of day or the company we are entertaining.”

Edge Lighting Monorail System works perfectly over a dining table

“The idea behind lighting is to have multiple sources, types and qualities of light so you can create the feel you desire in the room. Everyone likes their dining room to have a show piece. However, if that is the only source of light in the room, you are asking a lot of that single chandelier. It will give you enough light to eat at the table, but you are really limiting how the room can feel.”

It is true that the chandelier selection is the first step in the process. Being that it is the focal point of the room, it must work with the energy you want to create. Furthermore, your other layer selections are based on this choice.

“What’s great about Lightology is that we offer many more options compared to your average lighting showroom and a totally unique palette of colors. All of Lightology’s sales staff are also certified in the trade and have extensive technical knowledge to ensure that the lighting you purchase will work correctly and safely within your home.”

Circle Suspension by Swarovski Architectural Lighting

Once the chandelier — also referred to as suspension lighting — selection is made, the next step is determining the secondary source of light, says Yager. You need to be able to highlight certain aspects of the room, whether it’s the top of a buffet, service at the dining table or artwork on the walls.

“For instance, we may want add light that will highlight the beautiful china on the table. For these types of circumstances, a little trick I do is I add two recessed cans, preferably MR-16s, on either side of the chandelier. I then cross the beams to where the light from the recessed cans actually covers the entire shape of the table. This allows the chandelier to be brought down to a soft glow, because I am not depending solely on it to light the entire table top. Now, the recessed cans shine down on any cut crystal, china or other reflective surfaces and illuminate the beauty of the table accents. This ultimately creates a more brilliant dining scene.”

LED Soft Strip is perfect for cove lighting, and comes in white (shown) and RGB (color).

“To add a more dramatic effect, a third layer of light, or ambient light, can be added to the space. This is achieved a number of ways. One option is adding wall sconces or a cove lighting application that washes light up the ceiling or down the wall. This ultimately creates a soft glow in the space, pulling the height of the ceiling up and accentuating any architectural highlights in the room, like a stone or brick wall. The thing to remember is, the more layers you incorporate, the more you can achieve.”

Another important aspect for lighting a space are the controls, says Yager. Having no dimmers or control system is like having a car without breaks or an accelerator. You have to be able to stop it, slow it down and make it do exactly what you want.

“Many people do not understand the value of dimming to create an atmosphere. Incorporating a control system into your design not only gives you the ability to set lighting scenes that are accomplished with the mere push of a button, you can also program the system to automatically change throughout the course of your evening.”

For control systems, Yager recommends the Radio Ra by Lutron. It is a system that works throughout the entire home, not just a single room. You can control all the lighting in the entire house by one master console. For those looking for a single room lighting control system, Yager recommends Lutron’s Grafik Eye.

“Every space presents its own unique set of circumstances. Can I say there is any one secret to lighting a dining room – no. There are rules of thumb to follow, however, multiple things can be done in a dining room. That is why it is important to have a certified lighting consultant who can advise you on how to best accentuate the space and not rely solely on a lonely chandelier. That’s where Lightology can help. Not only do we offer a completely unique spectrum of lighting, our knowledgeable staff can work directly with your architect and/or interior designer to create the best lighting scheme to enhance your living environment.”

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