Tag Archives: Color Temperature

Lights, Camera, Lightology!

Interior Designer Adele Young visited the Lightology Showroom Monday morning with a film crew from Octane Rich Media. The mission? To show designers and homeowners what a difference great lighting makes.

Behind the Scenes

Octane Rich Media Crew (left) – Adele Between Takes in the Morpheus Room (right)

Young knows that when it comes to design, lighting not only sets the tone but also makes or breaks the atmosphere. Beautiful lighting is a design element unto itself.

Behind the Scenes - Lights. Camera. Coffee. Action!

Lights. Camera. Coffee. Action!

What Makes Great Lighting?

Great lighting involves more than stylish fixtures that complement decor and tie a room together.

It’s important to understand the various properties of light and how they interact within any given setting. Equal parts art and science, designing with light can take a lifetime to master.

Fortunately, anybody can learn some basic lighting principles that dramatically impact the look and feel of any space.  Some of these include:

- Layers of light
- Color temperature (“shades” of white light)
- Color rendering (quality of a light source), measured as CRI

cctstair

Color Temperature Stairway – Lightology

Light Education

With Lightology’s array of educational, interactive exhibits and captivating Light-Art displays, we can’t think of a better place for Adele to demonstrate the basic principles of good lighting design.

(Just last week, a “Design with Light” class from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago visited the showroom for an educational tour.)

We look forward to seeing the finished results, and we’ll post an update when the video is available.

Adele Young is an interior designer and the owner of Chicago design firm VDL Interiors. She is also an Ambassador for #IntDesignChat on Twitter.

Chicago-based Octane Rich Media is a creative agency that produces original content for HD video, web design, and mobile apps.

Visit our Facebook page to see more photos from the shoot.

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Museum of Light

Last Week, a group of 20 design students from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) visited the Lightology Showroom for a Lighting Education Tour. Lighting Designer Diane Fairchild and Architect Richard Kasemsarn brought their “Design with Light” class to Lightology for an immersive educational experience.

Catwalk

Students Tour Lightology – View from the Catwalk

The one hour student tour explored fundamental lighting principles, the properties of light, lighting design techniques, and the evolution of electric lighting technology. This design class is one of many to have taken the tour, which evolved over the years as increasing numbers of student groups requested access to Lightology’s space.

 Students Walk Through Color Temperature Stairway (left) and Start at the Bottom of the History of Light Stairwell (right)

Students Tour Color Temperature Stairway (left) – History of Light Stairwell Bottom Landing (right)

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the International Academy of Design & Technology, and Harrington School of Design are but a few of the prestigious design schools that often ask for student tours at Lightology.

Tour leader Andrew Goldman notes, “We’ve heard a lot of feedback that these student groups leave Lightology with a deeper appreciation and understanding of things they’ve been learning about in class. Our exhibits and displays allow them to see and touch the things they learn in books.”

Ascending the History of Light Stairwell

Ascending the History of Light Stairwell

More than a Showroom

Lightology founder and owner Greg Kay sees the tours as a sign that he must be doing something right. The award-winning lighting designer and Master Electrician opened Lightology in 2001 with a mission to offer the finest modern and contemporary lighting in the world. At the same time, he wanted to create a world-class educational center for lighting design.

“For me, Lightology has always been about more than just selling light fixtures—it’s more than a place to browse and shop,” says Kay.

Color Temperature Stairway

Color Temperature Stairway

“When I first had the idea to open Lightology, I knew I wanted people to be able to explore the showroom as they would The Museum of Science and Industry, for example.”

Indeed, it’s no stretch to think of Lightology as Chicago’s Unofficial Museum of Light. The modern, glass-enclosed structure boasts 3 stories of stunning lighting displays and looks more like an art gallery than a lighting store. A variety of eye-catching and unexpected Light Art displays add to the ambience.

Visitors may explore a host of permanent, educational and interactive exhibits on the properties of light and color, the history of electric lighting, and the emergence of LEDs as the future of lighting. A breathtaking exhibit in the Morpheus Room demonstrates the impact of light and lighting systems on architecture, design, and human emotion.

In addition to educational tours for design and architecture students, Lightology’s award-winning showroom also hosts a variety of lighting seminars, industry training sessions, and other events. Complementing these educational experiences is a multitude of cultural events, parties, and photo shoots that take place throughout the year. (Even weddings!)

“Lightology is an experience,” affirms Kay. “It’s an adventure, a resource for lighting education, and really an opportunity to expand people’s notions about light, art, and the world around them.”

For more information, contact Fred Kern at fkern@lightology.com or call 773-770-1143.

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LED Lighting Basics and The Lighting Facts Label

In the last two months, Lightology has partnered with top LED manufacturers, Edge Lighting, Pure Lighting and Philips Lightolier to teach Chicago’s architects and designers all about LEDs through educational seminars at our downtown Chicago showroom. Through these presentations, we’ve collected 5 helpful tips on LEDs that anyone can use to make sure they purchase the right LED for any project!

1)    Look for the Lighting Facts Label

Sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Lighting Facts Label is the ‘nutrition facts label’ for LEDs, providing a quick summary of product performance data.

By introducing transparency to the lighting supply chain, the label guards against exaggerated claims and helps ensure a satisfactory experience for lighting buyers.

Luminaire manufacturers who take the pledge agree to use the label to disclose performance results in five areas—lumens, efficacy, watts, correlated color temperature (CCT), and color rendering index (CRI)—as measured by the industry standard for testing photometric performance, IES LM-79-2008.

2)    Color (Correlated Color Temperature)

Students Visit the Color Temperature Wall, which shows all the different colors of light, at the Lightology Showroom

Color Temperature measures light color.

  • “Cool” colors have higher Kelvin temperatures (3600–5500 K).
  • “Warm” colors have lower color temperatures (2700–3500 K).

These colors are charted on the Kelvin scale for you to use when choosing a light source. Many LEDs are developed with a color temperature of 2700K, which is the same as a standard incandescent, or 3000K, which matches the color of Halogen light.

It is important to match the color temperature in all light sources when designing a space, otherwise the differences might be quite noticeable.

3)   Quality (Color Rendering Index)

This picture shows that the colors on the tissue box look better under LEDs with a higher CRI. All three tissue boxes are lit under the same Color Temperature, only the CRI is different.

CRI measures color accuracy, or more specifically, it is the effect of the lamp’s light spectrum on the color appearance of objects.

Based on a scale from 1-100 (100 being the best), a low CRI LED will make colors in fabrics, paint and people look duller, less vibrant. It’s a great idea to place color samples from your project underneath LEDs with differing CRIs to help determine which LED looks best.

Typically, a CRI in the mid-70s and up is acceptable for commercial applications. For residential applications, A CRI of 80 or above is preferable.

4)    Lumens, Watts and Lumens per Watt

This chart shows the comparison in efficacy between an incandescent, fluorescent and LED light source.

Lumens measures light output. The higher the number, the more light is emitted.

Watts are ONLY a measurement of the energy required to light the product. The lower the wattage, the less energy used.

Lumens per Watt is a way to measure efficiency, similar to the Miles Per Gallon you get in your car. The higher this number is, the more efficient your product is.

5)    Thermal Management

The Scope LED Head uses aluminum as a heatsink to pull heat away from the LED, making sure it maintains the 50,000 hour lifespan.

Heat plays a major factor in the lifespan of an LED. LEDs are a condensed point source that gets very hot, so an aluminum heatsink is necessary to dissipate the heat over a larger surface and keep the junction (where the LED meets the circuit board) temperature below 80°C.

Running an LED just a few degrees too warm can shorten the lifespan of an LED up to 50%! A good rule of thumb is in an open air environment, the LED needs 2.5 square inches of heatsink for every 1 watt.

Use Edge Lighting’s Scope LED as an example. At 9 watts, the scope needs 22 sq. inches of heatsink. The cylindrical fixture is 2.24”W x 4”H. You use the formula below to determine the square inches of the aluminum fixture (the heatsink).

Width x π x Height

2.24 x 3.14 x 4 = 28 square inches

The Scope LED fixture exceeds the required amount of heatsink to guarantee LED lifespan. Keep in mind that enclosed fixtures, like recessed LEDs can require around 15 square inches per 1 watt, so the heatsinks on these fixtures will be much larger, but still hidden from view.

Download a PDF of our Lamp Comparison Chart to see some of the basic differences between lighting options available to you.

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